POW Medal of Honor Recipients - Vietnam

Thank you, Soldiers

 

"The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." G. K. Chesterton

 

I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives,

I like to see a man live so that his place will be proud of him.

Abraham Lincoln

 

"Press the Attack!" -- General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson

 

Some People Dream the Dream...

Some People Live the Dream...

Some People Defend the Dream...

 

GOD BLESS THE DEFENDERS.

Veteran Tributes by Erich Anderson

 

 

Vietnam Wall, casualties by State and City

 

POW/MIAs from Vietnam

 

WE ARE AMERICANS by Sam Gipp "The Meaning of the Flag Draped Coffin"

 

Pilot down!

 

 

May God Bless America!

 

 

 

Wisdom 3:1-9
“The souls of the virtuous are in the hands of God,
no torment shall ever touch them.
In the eyes of the unwise, they did appear to die,
their going looked like a disaster,
their leaving us, like annihilation;
but they are in peace.
If they experienced punishment as men see it,
their hope was rich with immortality;
slight was their affliction, great will their blessings be.
God has put them to the test
and proved them worthy to be with him;
he has tested them like gold in a furnace,
and accepted them as a holocaust.
When the time comes for his visitation they will shine out;
as sparks run through the stubble, so will they.
They shall judge nations, rule over peoples,
and the Lord will be their king for ever.
They who trust in him will understand the truth,
those who are faithful will live with him in love;
for grace and mercy await those he has chosen.”
Wisdom 3:1-9
“The souls of the virtuous are in the hands of God, no torment shall ever touch them. In the eyes of the unwise, they did appear to die, their going looked like a disaster, their leaving us, like annihilation; but they are in peace. If they experienced punishment as men see it, their hope was rich with immortality; slight was their affliction, great will their blessings be. God has put them to the test and proved them worthy to be with him; he has tested them like gold in a furnace, and accepted them as a holocaust. When the time comes for his visitation they will shine out; as sparks run through the stubble, so will they. They shall judge nations, rule over peoples, and the Lord will be their king for ever. They who trust in him will understand the truth, those who are faithful will live with him in love; for grace and mercy await those he has chosen.”

 

 

Captain Lance Peter Sijan, U.S.A.F., Medal of Honor

 

His outstanding resistance to torturous interrogation was a great inspiration to POWs

in the North Vietnamese prison camps and to generations of American fighting men since.

 

 

       

The Lance P. Sijan Story - Into The Mouth Of The Cat (1998)

 

Tribute to Lance Sijan by the Green Berets

About Captain Sijan

Medal of Honor Citation

Air Force Association - Lance Sijan

 

“Downpour, Soldier Lance”

 

Vietnam was covered in clouds

Clouds of precipitation

Clouds of hidden information

Clouds of contemplation 

 

The rain, the soldier

Some fluff themselves up 

Some break under enough

Some are entirely completely tough

 

The downpour, soldier Lance

Crashed down on the enemy

With attack carefully heavenly

The man was more thoughtful than savagely 

 

Then came a night, most should remember

That cold, dismal night in the middle of November

The other rain scattered when the thunder came to lure

But in the mist of the scatter his own bomb became insecure 

 

When thrown from the raindrop dance

Hitting the ground broken, was soldier Lance

The sunrays tried to grab him at any chance

But staying true to himself “No” was his stance

 

He crawled

His body mauled

His head stalled

His heart called

 

He had the others

He had a brother

He had a sister

He had a mother and a father

 

When the thunder captured him after 46 days

He felt his own health slipping away 

He felt his faith take him to stay

He felt his determination bubble and sway 

 

The downpour crashed 

The downpour slid

The downpour hid

The downpour somehow had to live

 

The fog helped the downpour

The fog struck the thunders eyes

The fog carefully carried the guy

The fog never would subside, soldier Bob, soldier Guy

 

Worried at home was a family of four

Their fifth being the almighty downpour 

The sister, the eye full of constellation 

Wanted her downpour with no hesitation 

 

Back in the Hilton he still resisted

No one could shake the soldier enlisted 

His pain made the wind scream silent 

For he never let them know how violent

 

Soon the sun pierced through the downpour 

He screamed for his father, in all of the horror 

Knowing this was the end he let the sun come

He was ready to be in a world up above

 

His parents accepted a medal of honor 

His siblings let everyone know of his power

He smiles now at them, proud of their light shower

And no one else feels a coward

 

Vietnam was covered in clouds

Clouds of precipitation

Clouds of hidden information

Clouds of contemplation 

But the downpour crushed it all. 

 

10/18/16

Dakota Joan Komorowski

 

 

The complete "Taps," originally "Il Silencio," (The Silence), in honor of Lance Sijan;

         
TAPS ...The Last Post:
A few years ago, a friend visited the Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial in the village of Margraten, about six miles from Maastricht. There lay buried 8,301 American soldiers killed in the battles to liberate Holland in the fall and winter of 1944-5. Sgt. Bill Dukeman, 101st Airborne Division, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Second Battalion, Company C (of "Band of Brothers fame) is buried there. He was killed in the battle of "The Crossroads" in northern Holland.
The Dutch hold an annual memorial concert every September at the above cemetery to remember and honor the Americans who died to free them in Operation Market Garden and subsequent efforts to eject the German army from Holland. Sgt. Dukeman, like many other fallen GIs, was "adopted" by a Dutch family. Dukeman's family in the States was contacted and hosted in Holland, and his grave site decorated each year by his Dutch "family." They keep his portrait in their home, displayed in a place of honor. Fathers pass this obligation down to their sons in Holland. This version of the original "taps" music is played by a 13 year old Dutch girl named Melissa Venema. The conductor of the orchestra is Andre Rieu from Holland.

Many of you may never have heard taps played in its entirety. The original version of Taps was called Last Post, and was written by Daniel Butterfield in 1801. It was rather lengthy and formal, as you will hear in this clip, so in 1862 it was shortened to 24 notes and re-named Taps. 
Melissa Venema is playing it on a trumpet whereby the original was played on a bugle. 
Watch this young lady's face while she's playing. This is no performance: it's an act of pure, unadulterated reverence. 
   
Watch at this site, and go full screen. 

http://www.flixxy.com/trumpet-solo-melissa-venema.htm

 

Colonel George Everett "Bud" Day, U.S.A.F., Medal of Honor

 

The first Commander of the MISTY FACs. The MISTY unit was formed as a

result of his leadership and vision. A fighter in three wars; WW II, Korea,

and Vietnam, he is the most decorated US Military soldier since

General Douglas MacArthur. Colonel Day is the recipient of 70 decorations,

the majority of which are combat awards.

 

A Real Man   

 

"I am, and have been all my life, a loyal American. I have faith in my

country, and am secure in the knowledge that my country is a good

nation, responsible to the world community of nations. I believed in my

wife and children and rested secure in the knowledge that they backed

both me and my country. I believe in God and that he will guide me and

my country in paths of honorable conduct. I believe in the Code of

Conduct of the U.S. fighting man. I believe the most important thing in

my life was to return from North Vietnam with honor, not just to return.

If I could not return with my honor, I did not care to return at all. I

believe that in being loyal to my country that my country will be loyal

to me. My support of our noble objectives will make the world a better

place in which to live." Colonel George Day, from the 

Super Sabre Society Website

 

Tribute by Kenneth Sampson, USAF, 363 Combat Missions;

That Spirit of the Great American Airman – Misty One.

Misty One died July 27, 2013 at age 88.  Misty One was a POW in the Hanoi prison 5 ½ years.  Misty One was Colonel George (Bud) Day.  He was called Misty One because he was the Commanding leader of the 416th Tac Fighter Squadron , Phu Cat Air Base, South Vietnam.  Their call sign was Misty. 

The Mistys were two seat F-100 Fast FACs operating over Laos and North Vietnam.  On August 27, 1967 Bud Day was shot down over North Vietnam.  He was captured, beaten, and tortured.  After 5 days he escaped.  Without his boots he traveled 25 miles south, eating only fruit and frogs.  After 10 days he made it across the Ben Hai River into South Vietnam, two miles from the U.S. Marine base at Con Thien.  He was captured again and shot in the leg and hand.  He was then forced to walk north to a prison at Vinh.  Later in the Hanoi prison he was beaten and starved much more.  He was hung from that infamous hook in the ceiling of the main torture cell with his body fluids dropping to the floor. 

John McCain was Bud Day’s cell mate.  John McCain said that Bud Day was the bravest man he ever knew and his fierce resistance and resolute leadership set the example of how to return with honor.  Colonel Day was the Air Force’s most highly decorated living airman with The Medal of Honor and the Air Force Cross.

In 2003 Colonel Bud Day’s influence and persuasive power forced the introduction of the “Keep Our Promise to America’s Military Retirees Act” for vote by the U.S. Congress.  It did not pass. 

But later, through considerable lobbying effort, Colonel Day was the main driving force that vigorously pressed for and ultimately passed and secured Tricare For Life for military retirees over age 65.

He was the high spirit of the American airman.

The American airman has the power of giving his own life for the life of a larger cause. The American airman holds his personal suffering to no account.  The American airman throws down in battle his all and says, “I will stand or fall with this cause.”

So every time your computer announces “A Tricare Claim Has Processed”, think of and remember that high American airman spirit that was Colonel George (Bud) Day -- Misty One.  His fame is bright.  Forever!

Now Gentlemen, are you ready for the salute?

I salute the bravest of our contemporaries, Colonel George (Bud) Day!

 

 

 

About Colonel Day and Citation

The complete "Taps," originally "Il Silencio," (The Silence), in honor of Bud Day;

Watch at this site, and go full screen. 

 

Colonel Leo Keith Thorsness, U.S.A.F., Medal of Honor

 

A great combat airman in the SAM killing "Wild Weasel" Unit,

(SAM = Russian Surface to Air Missile units), Colonel Thorsness

was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the

outstanding defense of his downed wingman, just prior to being

shot down himself, captured, and spending six years in captivity

as a POW of the North Vietnamese.


 

About Colonel Thorsness and Citation

 

Bud Day and Leo Thorsness at the dedication of buildings named

in their honor, DAY MANOR and THORSNESS MANOR, at Goodfellow AFB, Texas in

May, 2010.

 

 

 

 

Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale, U.S.N., Medal of Honor

 

The highest ranking POW held, Admiral Stockdale was an

outstanding leader in the extremely harsh conditions of the

POW camps. His truly heroic leadership of the POWs'

resistance was a key reason for the "Return with

Honor" of the American POWs to the States.

 

Admiral James Stockdale, Academy of Achievement, Washington, D.C., inducted 1976

 

 

 

About Admiral Stockdale and Citation

The USS Stockdale

The complete "Taps," originally "Il Silencio," (The Silence), in honor of James Stockdale;

Watch at this site, and go full screen. 

 

Jon Cavaiani, Sergeant Major E-9, U.S. Army, Medal of Honor

 

 

 

About Sergeant Major Cavaiani and Citation

 

 

Don Cook, Colonel O-6, U.S. Marine Corps, Medal of Honor

 

 

 

About Colonel Cook and Citation

 

 

William Port: Sergeant E-5, U.S. Army, Medal of Honor

 

 

 

About Sergeant Port and Citation

 

 

Rocky Versace, Captain O-3, U.S. Army, Medal of Honor

 

 

 

About Captain Versace and Citation

 

   
   
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